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March 9, 2013 / diannegray

Shove off, Sandra!

Cyclone SandraI watched with panic interest this week as Severe Tropical Cyclone Sandra formed off the coast in the Coral Sea. The RUC is still without a roof and stumps until next Thursday and I’m no genius, but I know a tropical cyclone could do a lot of damage to my poor house if it hit now. It’s amazing how we forget we are just sitting on this planet at the mercy of nature and at any time things can change very quickly.

When we lived in the old barracks (were the RUC now sits) a cyclone hit and I vividly remember the ‘eye’ passing over the top of us. If you’ve even been through a hurricane or cyclone, you’ll know the terror it brings, but once you’re in the eye, the experience changes to AWESOME! When I experienced it, the wind stopped dead and a huge shaft of golden sunlight covered the entire landscape. I thought at any moment Charlton Heston would appear from the massive wall of clouds like Moses in The Ten Commandments. I looked at the grass – it was gold! The trees were gold, the sun was gold and the air was gold. I felt like I had been transported to another universe. And then that wall moved closer and closer – and the wind hit like a jumbo jet!

At the moment Sandra is moving AWAY from the coast – erm, can we please keep it that way? These things are so unpredictable…

I my last post I talked about being cleared of a Code of Conduct charge last year. If you want to read about it, I’ve linked it here. I’ve also sent the link to some newspapers 😉

On another note – I was wandering around the farm last week and found a plant and I have no idea what it is. The leaves are very ‘orchid’ like, but I’ve never seen this flower before.

Any ideas what it could be?

UPDATE: I’ve now been informed that this plant is a Hoya 😀

What is this flower

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135 Comments

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  1. Alastair / Mar 9 2013 7:47 am

    Looks like an old swimming hat

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 7:51 am

      LOL! It does! 😀 Maybe that’s where they got the idea from…

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  2. Polysyllabic Profundities / Mar 9 2013 7:48 am

    No idea, but it’s absolutely gorgeous!! Hope Sandra continues to venture in any other direction!!

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 7:51 am

      Absolutely – and she’s sucking all the clouds out to sea which is a good thing for the moment…

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  3. Sheila Morris / Mar 9 2013 7:53 am

    Fabulous flower reminds me of one of ours in South Carolina but of course I can’t remember the name. You are absolutely correct. We can’t do anything about the weather except hope that it helps us more than it hurts us. Your description of the eye of the cyclone was terrific. Hope the weekend finds the sun smiling on your RUC.

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:13 am

      I hope so too, Sheila! I don’t care what happens after we get the roof on (well, kind of – I’m not really looking forward to going through another cyclone at any time) 😉

      At first I thought the flower was a fake – but it’s not. I’ve asked a lot of people and they don’t know – weird! 😯

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  4. Sheila Morris / Mar 9 2013 7:54 am

    Just thought of it. Hydrangea. but they’re typically blue or white. Not that gorgeous color you have.

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:14 am

      It does kind of look like a Hydrangea, but it’s a creeper and each flower has a silver star in the middle of it 😉

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  5. suth2 / Mar 9 2013 8:05 am

    I think it is called Hoya. Not sure if that is how you spell it. Just checked my “what plant is that” book and yes it is Hoya, botanical name Asclepiadaceae

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:18 am

      Woo Hooo! Thank you – I just googled it and you’re right! They can grow 6ft tall – YIKES! I’m going to have hanging baskets of them off my veranda. They are SO PRETTY! 😀

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  6. John / Mar 9 2013 8:09 am

    Cool plant!

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:23 am

      I’ve just found out it’s a native – very cool indeed! 😉

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      • John / Mar 9 2013 1:31 pm

        So unique, a spherical flower plant.

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  7. Another 12 Novels in 12 Months / Mar 9 2013 8:12 am

    That is a beautiful plant! My fingers are crossed that Sandra continues out to sea.

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:26 am

      It is very pretty indeed! Thanks for the ‘finger crossing’ – I really need it (and appreciate it!) 😀

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  8. markharwoodwriter / Mar 9 2013 8:14 am

    What a crazy experience, to have been in the eye of a storm, literally. Last year a local science museum had an exhibit that was supposed to imitate the experience of being hit by a tornado…but in the end it was just a lot of TV screens and wind effects. I can’t imagine… Great post!

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:30 am

      It was a crazy experience, Mark! After been buffeted and feeling like the roof was going to give any minute, it stopped very suddenly. No wonder this is the time people get injured because it feels like it’s completely gone, but there is that wall that hits with such force that you can literally get blown away if you’re outside. The other odd thing is the air pressure – it’s like being in a plane and your ears keep ‘popping’ because of the intense pressure changes… Amazing!

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    • diannegray / Mar 11 2013 10:08 am

      Just on a side note here, Mark. When I click on your name I’m taken to a page that says you no longer exist 😦 This has happened to me a few times. Can you please put the link to your page here, so I can come over for a visit? 😀

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      • markharwoodwriter / Mar 15 2013 6:10 am

        That’s weird. I’ll see if I can fix that, but sure, here’s my blog, thanks: readingwritingother.wordpress.com

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      • diannegray / Mar 15 2013 7:11 am

        I just tried it and it worked – thank you 😀

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      • markharwoodwriter / Mar 18 2013 9:37 am

        Awesome. Thanks for bringing that to my attention.

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  9. the eternal traveller / Mar 9 2013 8:17 am

    I hope Sandra just keeps on heading east and takes this ghastly damp fog we’re getting with her. I have a sister-in-law called Sandra and the family has been blaming her for this weather for weeks. Every time she comes to Queensland it rains. She was here in January 2011 and at the start of this year too for Oswald. In 1986 we experienced Cyclone Greta in Darwin. She was only category 1 but that was more than enough. It sounded like a steam train was going through the house for hours. Good luck!

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:39 am

      LOL! Poor Sandra! Sorry, but I’m laughing hard here. I was hoping no one called Sandra would take offence when I posted this 😆 Please tell your sister-on-law it’s not personal 😉

      I know that steam train sound – it’s terrifying!

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      • the eternal traveller / Mar 9 2013 8:49 am

        Our biggest worry now is that we are having a big family get together the week after Easter on Fraser Island and Sandra is coming! If she keeps on bringing rain with her she won’t be invited to anything ever again.

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      • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:53 am

        LOL! You’ve started me laughing again 😆 I’ll be watching the weather closely around that time and thinking of you! 😉 Fingers and toes crossed that it’s all clear…

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      • the eternal traveller / Mar 9 2013 8:56 am

        Ha! We’re all hoping for good weather. It could get nasty if six family groups stuck inside together for five days all because of Sandra.

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  10. kford2007 / Mar 9 2013 8:20 am

    The flower is beautiful and reminds me of a hydrangea, but it’s not one. I’ll send this over to my plant guru and see if she knows what it is.

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:42 am

      I’ve now been told it’s a Hoya – native to these parts 😀 I’ve taken some cuttings and am going to hang them off my veranda. It’s probably one of the most beautiful flowers I’ve ever seen! 😀

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  11. billyraychitwood1 / Mar 9 2013 8:25 am

    Wife Julie says it looks like a Hoya – she showed me a picture which looks exactly like yours. It’s a tropical plant in the dogbane family, mostly native to Asia, Philipines, and Australia — also called waxplant, waxvine,and waxflower… generally evergreen perennial creepers or vines. Hey, it’s good to have these wives around! 🙂

    Regarding Tropical Cyclone Sandra, good riddance! No more cyclones are allowed anywhere near your latitude!… You listening, God?

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    • diannegray / Mar 9 2013 8:47 am

      She’s right, Billy Ray! Wives ARE fabulous! Thank her very much for me 😀

      Tropical Cyclone Sandra should be kicked right out to sea (p.l.e.a.s.e, God…) 😀

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  12. harulawordsthatserve / Mar 9 2013 8:55 am

    I don’t know what it’s called, but it’s really beautiful:-) Sandra, Sandra stay away, from our friend Dianne Gray!

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  13. nrhatch / Mar 9 2013 9:11 am

    Hope that cyclone Sandra wafts her way out to sea
    We don’t need her huffing and puffing around the RUC

    Love that floral “bathing cap” flower . . . glad you now know what it is.
    It will look FAB around your veranda.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:00 am

      Apparently that flower grows very easily in pots so I can’t wait to get it up onto the veranda – I’ve been wondering which plant to have there, Nancy 😀

      I just checked the weather (again) and I think Sandra is listening to me – she seems to be heading East! YAY 😀

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  14. Amanda / Mar 9 2013 9:22 am

    You have had some amazing experiences Dianne!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:02 am

      I certainly have, Amanda. It’s odd when things happen and you think ‘Oh yeah, that’s right. I’ve done that!’ If it wasn’t for my blog I’d probably never bother writing these things down 😉

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  15. mcwoman / Mar 9 2013 9:42 am

    Saying prayers that Sandra likes the sea better than going on shore. You don’t need any more challenges right now. And, the HOYA is beautiful! Reminds me a little bit of hydrangeas that grow around here. Thanks for sharing the beauty.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:04 am

      Thank you, Barb 😀 I think Sandra is starting to behave herself now and listening to everyone who is screaming at her to stay away 😀 The Hoya is absolutely stunning and you’re right, it is like a tiny hydrangea 😉

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  16. Jill Weatherholt / Mar 9 2013 9:54 am

    Beautiful flower! Do they grow in clusters? Your veranda is going to be fabulous! I can’t wait to read about the Code of Conduct saga.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:07 am

      They do grow in clusters, Jill. Absolutely stunning! I had some friends drop over to see the RUC yesterday and they were flabbergasted at it’s beauty (so I know it’s not just my imagination!). They all rolled up their sleeves and got into cleaning it and pulling out old doors and old wires – it was fantastic 😀

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  17. The Bumble Files / Mar 9 2013 10:09 am

    That plant is gorgeous! Stay away, Sandra! I hope it continues to move and you can catch your breath and begin to enjoy this new life of yours! Hang in there.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:08 am

      It’s amazing how life always throws something our way to say, ‘don’t relax just yet!’ 😀 Sandra has moved further east this morning so it looks like she’ll be staying out at sea for some time (fingers crossed) 😉

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  18. Tracy / Mar 9 2013 10:12 am

    I’ve never experienced that kind of storm being on the mainly temperate UK but was out in the big storm we had here in the 80’s and that was bad enough. I hope you get plenty of settled weather that poses no danger to you or the RUC.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:13 am

      I’m not a fan if big storms because it makes you realise how vulnerable you are to mother nature’s fury! I don’t want to go through another one any time soon, but I guess living in this area it’s inevitable that I will (unless I see it coming and fly south to spend a few weeks with my daughter!) 😉

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  19. 1girl4adamwest / Mar 9 2013 11:19 am

    What a pretty Hoya!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:13 am

      It is absolutely beautiful! I don’t know why I’ve never seen one before 😀

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  20. The British Asian Blog / Mar 9 2013 11:22 am

    Not sure, but what a beautiful plan or flower…

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:14 am

      Apparently it’s called a ‘Hoya’ and is native to this area. It’s amazing how you can live in a place for so many years and not see something like this 😉

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  21. bluebee / Mar 9 2013 11:36 am

    It does look as though Sandra is heading out to sea. Hope she gets lost there.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:15 am

      I’m hoping so too, Bluebee! I just checked BOM again and Sandra is almost out of our radar range – YAY!

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  22. roughwighting / Mar 9 2013 11:40 am

    Wow, the idea of a bathing cap brought back memories of my days as a lifeguard, watching some of the ‘matrons’ wearing those pink plastic flower caps. Soooo ugly (for a swim cap) but so beautiful as a flower of nature.

    Stay safe!

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    • Photos With Finesse / Mar 9 2013 12:52 pm

      I remember those floral swim caps! Thanks for my laugh of the evening!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:16 am

      LOL! I remember those floral caps as well – those women thought they looked fantastic! 😀

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  23. Jacqui Murray / Mar 9 2013 11:49 am

    That is beautiful! It looks like a cousin to a hyacinth. How does it grow?

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:18 am

      It’s a climber, Jacqui. It has little roots all over it’s stems making it easy to take cuttings. If you give it a wire grate it will climb up, otherwise it will just hang in baskets. I absolutely love it! 😀

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  24. Adam S / Mar 9 2013 11:50 am

    That Hoya is badass. I love perennial gardening! Definitely probably out of my zone though..

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:20 am

      I love the ‘volunteers’, Adam. Those plants that just spring up and you don’t have to do anything to get them going! It seems like this is one of those plants! 😀

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  25. jmgoyder / Mar 9 2013 11:56 am

    That description of the eye of a cyclone is fantastic – glad it is bypassing you this time.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:21 am

      Me too, Julie! It really had me on my toes there for a few days 😯

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  26. justinwriter / Mar 9 2013 12:20 pm

    Haha, love your Charlton Heston moment. 🙂 But, yeah, the cyclone must have been terrifying. Nice plant. Is it waxy? Looks like something you’d see underwater with coral.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:22 am

      It actually is ‘waxy’, Justin, and each flower has a tiny hard silver star in the centre. When I first saw it I thought it was fake! LOL – that’s how much I know about plants 😉

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  27. Photos With Finesse / Mar 9 2013 12:51 pm

    I should have read the comments first, took me a while, but I discovered it was a Hoya Carnosa. Also known as a Wax Plant for it’s waxy flowers. Part of the Dogbane family. (Has been banished from the Asclepiadaceae family according to Wikipedia.) I’ve only ever seen them as houseplants. (And I can guarantee we’d never just happen upon one on the farm up here LOL.)

    Sending powerful thoughts your way to keep the evil Sandra away! 😀

    – Suzan –

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:27 am

      Thanks for all that info, Suzan 😉 I’m learning more and more about this little plant every hour. I thought it was fake when I first saw it because of it’s perfect waxy flowers with the little silver star in the centre. How can something like this just grow out of the blue? If I’d seen it growing in pot in a gardening shop first I probably would have spent anything to get it LOL! It’s just growing wild here 😀

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  28. Ruth Rainwater / Mar 9 2013 1:32 pm

    Keeping my fingers crossed for you!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:28 am

      Thank you so much, Ruth! I think your positive thoughts are working 😀

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  29. EllaDee / Mar 9 2013 4:17 pm

    What a beautiful Hoya flower. I’ve seen one, exactly where eludes me but it was a domestic pot plant situation not in the wild so it should go well decorating the RUC verandah 🙂
    We’ve been fortunate in Sydney but I feel for the northern east and west coast residents who are sick to death of extreme weather and looking forward to a mild, dry unremarkable winter. Fingers crossed for you, and for us as we’ll be heading north to our house for Easter and it’s been wet enough there 😀

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:31 am

      I’m not sure what’s going on with the weather in south Queensland and NSW. It seems they have been getting our tropical wet season! It’s been remarkably dry up here in Cairns and everyone keeps saying ‘the wet seasons coming’ but it’s not, they’re copping it down south. I really hope it behaves for you over Easter! 😉

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  30. Irish Katie / Mar 9 2013 5:40 pm

    oh wow … that is one of the most beatiful set of flowers I have ever seen….I have to look it up now and find out more…wow…that is stunning.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:32 am

      That’s exactly what I said when I saw it, Katie! I couldn’t stop looking at it and feeling it to see if it was real! 😀

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  31. Janna G. Noelle / Mar 9 2013 5:48 pm

    That flower is incredible! I’ve gotta get myself down to Oz so I can geek out on plant ecology and buy local field guides.

    I’ll keep my fingers crossed for you that Sandra stays far far away. Though your experience in the eye of the storm that time sounds like something I’d enjoy. I’ve lived though a couple of natural disasters in my time (one hurricane and one ice storm), and as destructive as such can be, I tend to find extreme weather thrilling. It’s a great reminder to us as humans that our place is fragile yet.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:40 am

      I’ve never been in an ice storm, Janna but it sounds terrifying! The eye of the storm made every scary moment worth it, I’ve never seen anything like that golden colour, it was absolutely amazing! You’re so right about these things reminding us of our fragile place, we really know we’re alive when we have to face nature and that’s something I love about living in the country.

      There’s another plant I saw recently growing down at the creek. It has a dark brown nut seed encapsulated in red webbing. It’s a native nutmeg and if I find another one I’ll get some pics because it’s beautiful! But I love the Hoya, I can’t believe I haven’t seen one before after living here for so long!

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  32. Jenny Ackland / Mar 9 2013 7:09 pm

    Hoyas are beautiful. My grandmother had them, and I have one here though it’s looking a bit sad with all the heat and isn’t blooming. It’s a pale pink and they are almost like sea anenomes. I remember being fascinated by them as a girl. And good luck for the RUC not getting buffeted or rained on! [PS your modified map made me laugh. It IS modified, isn’t it? 🙂 ]

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:43 am

      I’m so glad you have Hoya growing, Jenny! It’s such a beautiful plant and they do look like sea anenomes 😀 It looks like Sandra is moving further out to sea now – so glad you liked the map – LOL 😀

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  33. ramblingsfromamum / Mar 9 2013 7:52 pm

    Damn I was in the class with my hand up saying Miss Miss it’s a Hoya – before I read you found out. I have one in my garden..very pretty but the ants love them. Shouldn’t shove off Sandra be p….orf Sandy!? Now off to read this conduct thingy 😉 xxx

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:45 am

      So they must grow in the colder climates as well! Wow – I can’t believe I’ve never seen one before. I’m feeling kinda dumb at the moment 😉 I just checked BOM again this morning and it seems like Sandra is listening to us! 😀

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  34. Rebecca Bradley / Mar 9 2013 8:55 pm

    The imagery of being in the eye is stunning. A part of me would love to experience it, and the sensible part wouldn’t!

    I hope it passes completely and you are left completely unscathed.

    That is one beautiful plant!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:47 am

      It would be really nice to just get ‘transported’ into the eye, Rebecca, without having to put up with the terror of the rest of the storm! But seeing the eye certainly made the entire ordeal worth it for me 😀

      I’ve checked the weather this morning and it seems Sandra is doing the right thing and skipping off to sea! YAY 😀

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  35. Letizia / Mar 10 2013 1:30 am

    I hope Sandra stays well clear of the RUC! What a baptism that would be! Stay safe and dry!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:49 am

      That would be one hell of a house warming party, Letizia! They say you ‘wet the head’ of the baby, but a cyclone now would probably drown her! 😯

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  36. lexiesnana / Mar 10 2013 2:36 am

    That flower does look like an old swim cap! Now off to read the conduct thingy as the others before me.I love stopping in to visit.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:50 am

      …and I absolutely love seeing you here! The flower is a beauty and I can’t wait to get it into pots around the veranda 😀

      Like

  37. ocdreader / Mar 10 2013 2:38 am

    What a gorgeous flower! I love finding new to me plants, so awesome and that one is so intricate.
    I will be doing my weather dance for you, not that it helps us change the weather here in So Cal, but it might add a slight butterfly-wing type wind that changes the weather across the world! haha, one can hope. I can’t believe you were looking out the window while smack dab in the center of a hurricane, it sounds amazing but eeek! Stay safe!!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:52 am

      I think your butterfly wing thing weather dance as worked because she’s now heading out to sea! YAY 😀

      Ermm – I actually wasn’t looking out the window – I was very naughty and went for a walk outside to see it (but don’t tell anyone!) 😯

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      • ocdreader / Mar 10 2013 9:01 am

        The butterfly dance works wonders.
        You are a wild woman! Wait, who was just talking about that guy on the metal roof in the thunderstorm…hahaah
        lol – pretty awesome though, I am jealous.

        Like

      • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 9:35 am

        LOL – yes, maybe I should take my own advice! 😀

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  38. Peter / Mar 10 2013 3:34 am

    I’m hoping that the March 10 Brisbane News that the storm is going to miss Queensland is good for you too. Here in the U.S. this has seemed to be the year of WEATHER with numerous weather events of catastrophic proportion.

    It’s true that we seldom take time to let our vulnerability in this big wide world sink in. On some levels I’m not sure whether it’s a good thing for us to be overly aware — fear can be so debilitating. On the other side of the coin, it’s hubris to live as if we really are the hot shots that we so often seem to think we are. We make all these “plans” and somehow it’s easy to think that just because we plan something that it’s going to happen. You are dealing with the contingencies of the RUC, we with the sale of our school, our daughter with the need for our school to get sold so that they can make business improvements on their new building — they seem to be circles within circles within circles.

    I’m hoping your safe. Here, we’ll just be doing our real estate dance and waiting…

    cheers,
    P

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:58 am

      The weather reports are looking more positive by the minute, Peter! I think Sandra has done the right thing and decided to head out to sea 😀

      It’s interesting you talk about ‘fear’ because I had a phobia about storms for many years before I experienced the cyclone. Once it happened it actually cured me on my fears. I’m not sure why, but maybe its because I survived and ever since then no storm has seemed as bad.

      Best of luck with your real estate dance – selling a house is very stressful and I wish you a smooth transition and all the best 😀

      Like

  39. 4amWriter / Mar 10 2013 6:09 am

    Beautiful plant. Is it growing wild, or did someone plant it? I will keep you and the RUC in my thoughts and hope that you at least get your roof on before the weather turns too dastardly!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 8:05 am

      The plant is in a pot, but it seems to have crept and grown into several other pots and up the wall, so I’m really not sure how it got there. I’ve asked everyone else and no one seems to know where it came from…apparently it does grow wild in the area, so maybe someone at the farm saw it and put a cutting there (I still can’t figure it out).

      The roof is set to go on next Thursday and so far Sandra is doing the right thing and heading out to sea (fingers and toes crossed). Thank you so much for sending all that positive energy to keep her away 😀

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  40. char / Mar 10 2013 8:39 am

    That flower is gorgeous. Crossing my fingers that the cyclone keeps moving away from you. Sounds scary to be in one of those.

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 9:34 am

      It’s very scary, Char! But seeing the ‘eye’ was actually worth it in the end 😉

      Sandra is moving away (happy dance) 😀

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      • char / Mar 10 2013 10:46 am

        The eye did seem very cool how you described it. I’ve heard how it’s that way, but I bet it was a lot more intense experiencing it yourself from the crazy winds, etc to the calm peaceful hush.

        Like

  41. robincoyle / Mar 10 2013 11:22 am

    Oh great. Now I have to worry about you. Good deal on being cleared of the Code of Conduct thing. The bastards.

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:05 pm

      LOL – I couldn’t have put it better myself, Robin! You’re wonderful 😀

      Like

  42. moderndayruth / Mar 10 2013 12:16 pm

    I am so glad Sandra passed you by! And Hoya is beautiful!!!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:06 pm

      Hoya is very beautiful! I’m going over to check the weather again (maybe I’m getting weather OCD) 😉

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  43. mrscarmichaelmrsc / Mar 10 2013 12:25 pm

    congrats on the charge dropping and sandra aannndd the flower naming 🙂

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:08 pm

      Thank you so much, my dear. I’m sure not knowing what that flower was would have annoyed me for a while! 😀

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  44. ripe red berries / Mar 10 2013 12:57 pm

    Glad to know your home is safe!! What a beautiful plant!

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    • diannegray / Mar 10 2013 7:19 pm

      Thank you! I think Sandra is well out to sea now 😀

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  45. Zen A. / Mar 10 2013 11:42 pm

    I hope Sandra stays away for good, though the way you described the eye is really fascinating! I think I would risk being in a storm just to experience it. 😉
    The Hoya is really beautiful! It reminds me of a plant really similar to it that we would find in my aunt’s garden. We used to pluck out the flowers and suck the ends for a really sweet honey-like nectar. =D

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 11 2013 8:49 am

      I might have to try sucking the ends for a really sweet honey-like nectar (erm – if I never come back to my blog, you know what’s happened…) 😉

      Sandra has gone – woo hoo! But I think there’s another one coming. It’s time for me to check the weather again 😯

      Like

  46. jmmcdowell / Mar 11 2013 6:39 am

    Adding my hopes that Sandra stays away from land. The name is far to close to Sandy, which devastated parts of the US last fall! And I love the comparison of the flower to the old swimming caps. 🙂 But the flower is much prettier!

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    • diannegray / Mar 11 2013 9:30 am

      I think ‘Sandy’ brings fear to the hearts of a lot of people 😦 Our ‘Sandra’ is now heading out to sea and we really hope she stays there and just blows herself out 😉

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  47. jannatwrites / Mar 11 2013 10:29 am

    Oooh, that flower is pretty! Here’s hoping Sandra gets lost at sea!

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    • diannegray / Mar 11 2013 10:43 am

      She’s already on her way out! Woo hoo – I’m SO relieved 😀

      Like

  48. Kozo / Mar 11 2013 12:00 pm

    Dianne,
    Your description of the eye of a hurricane gave me a glimpse of God. //bow// I hope that experience becomes a major scene in one of your books I love the gold grass, trees, and air. It reminds me of scenes from a movie where everything goes into slow motion during a chaotic event. Then, BOOM, the chaos returns.
    I hear the storm is missing the RUC. Maybe Moses had something to do with it. {{{Hugs}}} Kozo

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 11 2013 12:51 pm

      Thank you my dear Kozo! Sandra is now floating off into the open ocean, but apparently Tim is coming… OH NO!

      The golden scene will never leave me 😀

      Like

  49. Anna Scott Graham / Mar 11 2013 12:19 pm

    Hope that storm did little in your neck of the woods. The description of being in the eye does sound awesome, ad rather novel-fodder like! 🙂

    Love that plant! Glad it’s no longer anonymous.

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 11 2013 12:53 pm

      I’ve taken some cuttings of that plant, Anna, and hopefully it will soon be growing from pots on my veranda 😀

      Sandra is gone now, but (oh no!) Tim is on the way towards us – IKES! 😯

      Like

      • Anna Scott Graham / Mar 11 2013 1:38 pm

        Hoping that Tim goes the way of Sandra! And thinking happy thoughts for those cuttings. 🙂

        Like

  50. pommepal / Mar 11 2013 11:18 pm

    The surfies down here are loving Sandra she has created huge swells and closed beaches for swimmers, hope she stays well out to sea. Hoyas are so dainty, is that one perfumed?

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 12 2013 12:04 am

      I lived on the NSW mid north coast for many years in my teens so I can imagine what the surfies think of those great waves! 😀 Apparently there is another storm on the way that is currently sitting in the gulf. If it turns into a tropical cyclone they’re going to name it Tim I think (reminds me a bit of the prime minister’s boyfriend!)

      The hoya does have a beautiful sweet scent 😀

      Like

      • pommepal / Mar 12 2013 10:25 am

        I went down to the beach at sunrise today and the surf is pumping and heaving with surfies 🙂

        Like

      • diannegray / Mar 12 2013 10:33 am

        What a beautiful sight!

        Like

      • pommepal / Mar 12 2013 10:52 am

        took 165 photos… 🙂

        Like

      • diannegray / Mar 12 2013 11:18 am

        Woah! Fantastic! 😀

        Like

  51. gabrielablandy / Mar 12 2013 2:10 am

    Wow, the thought of being in the eye of a storm – that’s intense. Glad you’re okay. That flower was seriously cool. It’s too amazing that things like that can grow – all the intricate information stored in a tiny seed to become that.

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 12 2013 6:08 am

      It’s very cool, Gabriela. What beauty and awe nature can bring! 😀

      Like

  52. Sheila / Mar 12 2013 3:48 am

    I love hurricanes even though people think I’m crazy for loving them. It’s so much fun to watch the wind whip everything around. I’ve seen my share of insane governmental stuff while at work, but can’t imagine working for a tax office. You deserve to be constantly surrounded by beautiful flowers for surviving such a thing!

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 12 2013 6:12 am

      Awww – thank you, Shelia! Those are fantastic thoughts. Once there was a baron wasteland called the tax off and now there are flowers! 😀

      Like

  53. Rick Mallery / Mar 12 2013 4:06 am

    Oh, I don’t know how I missed this post! Well, hopefully you know by now if you (and the RUC) are safe from the storm. Love the photo of the flower too!

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 12 2013 6:19 am

      We’re safe from that storm, but there’s another on its way (nothing is ever simple in this neck of the woods!) 😀

      Like

      • Rick Mallery / Mar 12 2013 6:58 am

        Well I wish you much safety in the coming days!

        Like

  54. sherrylcook / Mar 12 2013 6:49 am

    ahhh Dianne…I know how you feel…living on the Gulf coast of the U.S. my entire life, I’ve endured many hurricanes. Year after year, warnings, watching the news, gathering necessities…lol I’ve never fled to higher ground but I’ve seen some real devastation. I’m so glad it all turned out good for you. I love the hurricanes, the power of mother nature is just unbelievable.

    Like

    • diannegray / Apr 8 2013 9:58 am

      The power of Mother Nature is amazing, Sherry! I’m so glad it didn’t hit us 😉

      Like

  55. Hazy Shades of Me / Mar 12 2013 5:32 pm

    Your description of a being ‘in the eye’ is both terrifying and exhilarating! Whoo! I’ll take your word for it though! And, I’m so glad you’ve discovered the name of that lovely flower already. A green thumb I do not have!

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 13 2013 6:39 am

      I try, but I’m not one of those green thumb people either – sometimes things grow for me and sometimes they die, it’s just hit and miss in my garden 😉

      You’re exactly right about the eye of the storm terrifying and exhilarating! 😯

      Like

  56. WordsFallFromMyEyes / Mar 16 2013 3:04 pm

    Ha ha – loved the title, is why I clicked.

    This sounds horrific though, really horrific. By now it should be pretty settled.

    Sorry can’t help with the plant! 🙂

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 16 2013 3:28 pm

      I’m glad you enjoyed this, Noeleen. A couple of lovely bloggers told me this plant is a Hoya 😀

      Like

  57. eof737 / Mar 24 2013 12:01 pm

    It’s a gorgeous flower and that pink is the prettiest. Your hurricane story is scary… Now off to read the Code story. 😉

    Like

    • diannegray / Mar 25 2013 5:58 am

      Thanks, Eliz. That flower is sensational. I’ve taken cuttings so I can have them growing around my veranda 😀 The code story is weird and was very stressful! 😯

      Like

  58. sakuraandme / Apr 5 2013 7:03 pm

    Hi Dianne. Thanks for stopping by my blog. It’s so so pretty. hugs Paula xx

    Like

    • diannegray / Apr 6 2013 7:49 am

      Awww – thank you, Paula 😀 It’s lovely to see you here 😀

      Like

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